Posts Tagged ‘wild’

Wildlife at close quarters

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Feeling adventurous and want to see at close quarters the work of Wildlife Alliance in Cambodia?

Sopheap the Sun Bear

Sopheap the Sun Bear

The Wildlife Rehabilitation Station is located in protected forest within the Cardamom Mountains in Koh Kong Province. Wildlife Alliance now offer the unique opportunity to stay in locally built chalets in an natural open grassland on site, while participating in one of many activities offered including: hiking to nearby hilltops and swimming in cool streams, setting up camera traps to help document the resident fauna and discovering the wildlife at various stages of release!

During your stay at the Wildlife Release Station, your guide will accompany you into the jungle and nearby surroundings to penetrate regenerating forest protected by Wildlife Alliance and the Cambodian Forestry Administration and situated far from human settlements or disturbance. EcoTour visits can include a variety of activities according to your schedule and all are provided as part of your donation to the Wildlife Release Station.

Savour the jungle:

Enjoy the isolation of the protected forest! Sleep in serenity in spacious thatched chalets and wake up to the sounds of its rare and endangered creatures including the morning call of wild pileated gibbons. Hike through the jungle tracking wildlife with your guide and swim in natural streams surrounded by trees.

Meet their animals:

Come see the wild animals around WRS who have been released by Wildlife Alliance and are making the protected forest their new home, including macaque monkeys, binturongs, civets and birds. Get up close with the bears (including Sopheap the sun bear in our photo) and other rescued animals living at WRS during their soft release, where they stay in safe forested enclosures to acclimatize to their new jungle habitat before release.

Get to know their dedicated staff:

Meet the full-time Cambodian staff rehabilitating and releasing animals rescued from illegal trafficking, raising orphaned animals and protecting the nearby forest. Tour the surrounding jungle with your English speaking guide and help staff set up camera traps and check them the following day for images of bears, binturongs and other wildlife!

For more on Wildlife Alliance’s unique Wildlife Release Station tours, visit

Into remote Cambodia

Monday, March 30th, 2015
Filming the Red Bull mountain bikers in Cambodia

Filming the Red Bull mountain bikers in Cambodia

Hanuman recently looked after a major overland expedition for Red Bull Media House, the extreme sports specialists. For this trip they were following some competition mountain bikers, including Rebecca Rusch, the “Queen of Pain”, down the Ho Chi Minh Trail through Laos and onwards south down the ‘Sihanouk Trail’ in Cambodia.

2 mountain bikes, 5 dirt bikes, 8 4WDs, this was an expedition through some of the most remote parts of Cambodia. Crossing into Cambodia at Trapeang Kriel, the crew headed northwest to Siem Pang before crossing the Sekong River and surfing through the sand to Veun Sai. After a comfortable overnight in Ban Lung, they continued south to Koh Nhek, using the old ‘Death Highway’ from Lumphat. From there, they blasted through Sen Monorom on the new road before veering off to follow the old King’s Highway through the jungles of Kaoh Seima Protected Forest, one of the most beautiful roads in Cambodia.

All of this was captured on state-of-the-art Red Epic Dragon 6K cameras, that means 9X the pixels of an HD camera or one hell of a lot of memory. It should make for an epic endurance film through some of the most remote and beautiful parts of Indochina.

Feeling at home

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

Sambo, Phnom Penh’s biggest star, heads for retirement in Mondulkiri’s forests.

Sambo says goodbye. Photo courtesy of PPP.

Sambo says goodbye. Photo courtesy of PPP.

There’s an important guest of honour at the Elephant Valley Project in Mondulkiri, northeast Cambodia this week. Sambo, the elephant who for many years was a well-known and distinctive Phnom Penh resident, has officially retired from giving rides at Wat Phnom, and is taking a well-earned retirement in the bamboo thickets of his new home in Mondulkiri. The Elephant Valley Project do fabulous work in providing a safe haven for former working elephants and Hanuman’s clients have been enjoying visits to the project for a few years now, to see these giants of nature enjoying themselves in their natural environment. And now visitors have a familiar face to meet when they visit EVP. Long may it continue. The Phnom Penh Post picture shows Sambo saying goodbye to well-wishers in the city.

Child-friendly Phnom Penh

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

So what does Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s capital, have to offer for children?

Climbing walls at Kids City

Climbing walls at Kids City

With chaotic traffic, a lack of green spaces and sights that are predominantly morbid, Phnom Penh would not seem like the most child-friendly city. Thing again. There are plenty of little gems to help you pass the time with your children in the capital. Plus, what kid doesn’t like a remork ride? One rule of thumb is that kids also love Buddhist temples – especially colourful temples like Wat Langka or Wat Ounalom, and hill temples like Wat Phnom, or outside of town, Oudong. Shimmering gold Buddhas, shiny stupas, animal statues and the occasional monkey give children plenty of visual stimulation (just keep their eyes averted from potentially scary demons). The Royal Palace is similarly rich in Buddhist iconography.

If your kids ride two-wheelers, consider renting bicycles and crossing the Mekong by ferry from the dock behind Imperial Garden Hotel. On the other side, smooth roads and trails lead 15km or so north to Smango, a guesthouse with decent food and a refreshing swimming pool. Phnom Penh has decent public play spaces, including a playground northwest of the Cambodian-Vietnam Friendship Memorial in Wat Botum Park, and another playground just south of Wat Phnom. To escape the heat (or the rain), Kids City on Sihanouk Boulevard, is a vast indoor play palace, with a first-rate climbing gym, an elborate jungle gym, a science gallery and an ice rink. Other indoor playgrounds (bring socks) with elaborate slides, bouncy castle and the like can be found at amusement park Dream Land, which also has a ferris wheel and other rides; and for younger children, Monkey Business, which has wi-fi and a cafe for adults. Many of the restaurants and cafes are child-friendly, but there are a few specifically aimed at families, including Le Jardin. The most interesting attraction is beyond the city limits and makes a good day trip: Phnom Tamao Wildlife Sanctuary, a rescue centre for Cambodia’s incredible wildlife.

Walking with the herd

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

Original elephant adventures with Cambodia’s EVP.

Gee Nowl, one of the EVP elephants

Gee Nowl, one of the EVP elephants

For an original elephant experience, visit the Elephant Valley Project. The project entices local mahouts to bring their over-worked or injured elephants to this sanctuary, where, in the words of project coordinator, Jack Highwood, ‘they can learn how to act like elephants again.’ A Briton with a contagious passion for elephants, Highwood is on a mission to improve the lot of Mondulkiri’s  working elephants. While Bunong tradition calls for giving elephants a certain amount of down time, Highwood says that economic incentives to overwork elephants prove too great for the impoverished mahouts of Mondulkiri. In addition to toting tourists around on their backs, elephants are hired to haul around anything and everything, including illegally cut timber. Most tour companies in Mondulkiri stress that their tours employ only humanely treated elephants. Highwood commends this, but says it’s the exception rather than the rule. “Most elephants in Mondulkiri are in a highly abused state. They are beaten on the head and made to do things they aren’t meant to be doing.’

Enter the Elephant Valley Project. Mahouts who bring their elephants here are paid a competitive working wage to retire their elephants full time to ecotourism. Mahouts continue to work with their elephants, feeding and caring for them and making sure they don’t escape into the wild. The elephants, for their part, can spend their days blasting through the forest in search of food, uprooting saplings to get to their yummy roots and hanging out by the river spraying mud on one another. You are not allowed to ride the elephants here. Instead, you simply walk through the forest with them and observe them in their element. In the process you learn a lot about not only elephant behaviour but also Bunong culture and forest ecology. Other project components include health care for the Bunong communities in the project area, and health and veterinary care for the mahouts of Mondulkiri. The Wildlife Conservation Society lauds the EVP for helping to protect the eastern reaches of the Seima-Protected Forest.

The main option for visiting the EVP is a day trip in which half the day is spent observing the elephants, and half the day is spent washing the elephants and doing other tasks around the project site. There are a few exquisite bungalows at EVP but at the moment they are not able to accept overnight stays. Access to the site is strictly-controlled so don’t show up unannounced and the maximum number of day trippers allowed per day is 12. The site is not open to visitors on Saturday and Sunday, however there are plans to open six days a week in the future.

The EVP recently announced a fund-raising effort so that one of Phnom Penh’s best-known residents, Sambo the elephant, can see out his final years enjoying himself with the other elephants at the project. Forced to retire by authorities from giving rides at Wat Phnom and then his daily walk along the riverfront of the capital, Sambo has been in limbo for a while but it looks likely that he will be the latest addition to the EVP. Which is welcome news. Hanuman have been big supporters of EVP for many years, so don’t hesitate to contact us for more details on this excellent adventure in northeast Cambodia.

River rafting through Angkor

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Bringing the Siem Reap River to life with exciting new raft adventures.

With the Flight of the Gibbon ziplines already a firm favourite amongst visitors to the Angkor Park in Siem Reap, Cambodia, a brand new activity is just about to take off with the arrival of Float Angkor, and their eco-tour raft adventures. Amongst the temples of Angkor lies the Siem Reap River, as it meanders its way from the hills above Angkor, through the temple complex and out into the Tonle Sap Lake. Float Angkor will bring the river and the natural beauty of the surrounding forest to life. Their rafts will accommodate no more than six people at a time, everyone gets a safety briefing and equipment before they are allowed on the river and go-pro helmet cams are also available. All of the river guides have been trained by a world champion kayaker, Eric Southwick, so you know you’ll be in safe hands. Float Angkor is expected to be fully operational by the end of this year.

Koh Ker awaits

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Abandoned for centuries, the temple complex of Koh Ker with many major structures including the pyramid of Prasat Thom, can now be seen in a day trip from Siem Reap. Hanuman Travel TV takes you there.

Koh Ker was the capital of the Angkor Empire from AD 928 to AD 944, but for a long time was one of the most remote and inaccessible temple complexes in Cambodia. Located a little over two hours northeast of Siem Reap by road, the complex has 42 major structures including the 40-metre high seven-tier pyramid of Prasat Thom and some of the largest lingas in the country. Koh Ker is also known for some of the most impressive sculptures of the Angkor period, some of which can be found in Phnom Penh’s National Museum.

Contact the Hanuman Team for more details on visiting Koh Ker, including our popular overnight safari. A trip there can be combined with a visit to Beng Mealea, another favourite temple of many visitors.

Remote Preah Khan of Kompong Svay

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Enjoy a look at one of Cambodia’s most remote temple sites at Preah Khan of Kompong Svay with Hanuman Travel.

Traditionally, Preah Khan of Kompong Svay district has been the toughest of the remote Angkorian temples to reach. Even now getting there at the peak of the wet season is almost impossible, and the best time to visit is between January and April when the trails are dry. It’s located some 93km north of Kompong Thom and 64km south of Tbeng Meanchey in Preah Vihear Province.

Most locals call the temple complex Prasat Bakan but it’s common name is Preah Khan of Kompong Svay. Covering almost 5 sq km, it’s actually the largest temple enclosure constructed during the main Angkor period, dating from the 9th to 13th centuries. The central tower at Prasat Preah Stung is adorned with large enigmatic faces and the central area of Preah Khan is overgrown by forest and has been badly damaged with many towers collapsing. Some of this was caused by severe looting at the site. If you are looking for a remote temple complex, then it doesn’t get much more remote than Preah Khan. Contact the Hanuman Team for more details, including our overnight safari at Preah Khan.

The Safari Experience

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Try our adventure in style in remote Cambodia.

Temple Safari is our signature trip and one we recommend to guests ahead of the forthcoming high season, from late October onwards. You will be transported back in time to an era before mass tourism and enjoy the intimacy and privacy of a remote jungle temple all to themselves. Solitary sunsets, spiritual sunrises, the Temple Safari experience brings the magic back to travel. It’s an original Hanuman creation and although it may sometimes be copied, it is never rivalled. Our pick of the one night Temple Safaris is Koh Ker, accessible in less than three hours from Siem Reap. It’s a popular option as it includes a visit to the jungle temple of Beng Mealea en route. Koh Ker was a 10th century rival capital to Angkor and is home to a prolific array of temples from this era. The views from the top of the Mayan-esque step pyramid of Prasat Thom is very impressive, and once again available to visitors after a few years off-limits, but other smaller temples are also striking, including Prasat Bram with its suffocating strangler figs. Our overnight location next to the temple walls, complete with a private candlelit dinner and a night in your comfortable tent, with Prasat Thom as your backdrop, is unrivalled. Boutique camping at its finest, as you can see on our video.

Another safari, the Sacred Mountain Safari, takes guests onto the top of Phnom Kulen, one of the most holy places in Cambodia. Located about 50km from Siem Reap, the jungle plateau is home to a rich array of natural and historic sites offering the most diverse variety of experiences amongst our safari trips. It’s a fantastic way to get off-the-beaten-track. The discovery of the extent of the ancient city of Mahendraparvata, has opened up new sites to visit and if you are prepared for an adventurous motorcycle ride, then even more of these sites become accessible to you. If not, there are still a wide variety of sights to enjoy. You can find out more about Temple Safari or the Sacred Mountain Safari from the Hanuman team, or online at and we promise, it’s an experience you won’t forget.

Fun for all the Family at Angkor

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Hanuman’s exciting Family Angkor Tour includes temples and lots of fun activities.

Flying through the trees with Flight of the Gibbon

Flying through the trees with Flight of the Gibbon

With more families travelling together than ever before, the temples of Angkor are a fascinating attraction for young and old and we have combined these amazing structures with a series of activities that we believe will wow all of the family, in our new 5-day/4-night Family Angkor program. Arrival day will be rounded off with a dinner and classical and folk dance performance. Our first sight of Angkor will be on the back of an elephant in Angkor Thom and onto the giant faces of the Bayon. If it’s activities you seek, Jungle Junction in town is the perfect place after lunch for families and children up to ten years old, or stay at your hotel for a relaxing swim. Mini-golf at Angkor Wat Putt is the next day’s morning activity, followed by a visit to the actual majestic temple itself after lunch – the largest religious monument in the world. An early wake-up to visit the atmospheric jungle temple of Ta Prohm will get you in the mood for an exhilarating experience on the ziplines of Flight of the Gibbon, through the treetops of Angkor. The excitement continues with an evening visit to the acrobats, jugglers and modern circus antics at Phare. For our final day, it’s off to the Great Lake for a glimpse of how the locals live their lives on the water followed by a visit to wood and stone carving workshops to see how the traditions of the country are being kept alive. That brings the curtain down on your Angkor adventures, with priceless memories stored in your memory banks and on your iPhones.  To get a feel for the ziplines of Flight of the Gibbon (pictured above), watch this Lonely Planet video of this fantastic adventurous activity at Angkor; Contact us at Hanuman for more details.