Posts Tagged ‘Myanmar’

Hanuman Teams Up with Backstreet Academy

Friday, November 11th, 2016

Hanuman Travel has teamed up with peer-to-peer experiential travel provider Backstreet Academy to offer some new experiences in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam.

Backstreet Academy homepage

Backstreet Academy homepage

Backstreet Academy has been cited by the BBC, National Geographic, The Guardian and Forbes for its original workshops with local characters from around the region and with Hanuman Travel’s penchant for original experiences with unique personalities we couldn’t help but take an interest. Choose from anything to wood and stone carving lessons to pencil and watercolour painting classes at the temples of Angkor. Classes in kickboxing are available, as well as the traditional Cambodian martial art of Bokator.

From the inception of Backstreet Academy as a social enterprise in Kathmandu, Nepal, the founders have promoted profit making and social impact hand-in-hand. Check out some of their original experiences in 10 countries across Asia at https://www.backstreetacademy.com/

Keep up with Hanuman Travel on Social Media

Monday, February 8th, 2016

To keep up with the latest news from Hanuman Travel in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar or Vietnam, check out our social media platforms, including a Facebook page, Twitter account and Youtube channel.

Hanuman Travel on Twitter

Hanuman Travel on Twitter

Find Hanuman Travel on Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/Hanuman-Travel-346648525371539/

Follow Hanuman Travel on Twitter at:

https://twitter.com/hanumantravel

Watch Hanuman Travel on Youtube at:

https://www.youtube.com/user/HanumanTourism

 

 

The Strand Cruise Set to Sail in Myanmar in 2016

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

The Strand Hotel in Myanmar, one of Myanmar’s signature hotels, has recently launched a new luxury river cruiser plying the classic Irrawaddy route between Bagan and Mandalay.

The Strand Cruise in Myanmar

The Strand Cruise in Myanmar

The Strand Cruise will set new standards of luxury for river travel in Myanmar. The 4-deck, 27-cabin vessel was built in Yangon and has a large swimming pool, sun deck terrace, gym/wellness facilities, spa & beauty parlour, alfresco and indoor dining and a cocktail lounge.

2016 sailings will be three or four-nights in duration with cruise operations scheduled to start in January 2016.

Contact Hanuman for special launch prices for Jan-Mar 2016 sailings. Rates include all excursions, on-board meals and soft drinks, local beer and house wine during meals, port charges, excursions with English speaking guides and satellite wi-fi. Passengers booking one of the two Strand Suites will have added extras such as a one-hour spa treatment of their choice and a night at The Strand Hotel pre- or post-cruise with private airport transfers.

Inside the Strand Cruise in Myanmar

Inside the Strand Cruise in Myanmar

Scheduled Sailings

The Strand Cruise 5 Days/4 Nights – Bagan to Mandalay

The Strand Cruise 4 Days/3 Nights – Mandalay to Bagan

http://www.thestrandcruise.com/

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all.

Hanuman at PATA Mart

Thursday, September 18th, 2014
The Hanuman booth at the PATA Travel Mart

The Hanuman booth at the PATA Travel Mart

The Asia Pacific region’s largest travel trade show, the  PATA Travel Mart 2014, kicked off in Phnom Penh at the Koh Pich Exhibition Center today. The 2-day PATA (Pacific Asia Travel Association) Travel show brought together more than 1,000 delegates from over 60 countries and regions around the world. The Hanuman booth at the event was manned by Nick Ray, Patrick Chase, Andy Brouwer and Tugdual Paul on day 1, and they welcomed a succession of visitors, eager to find out more about Cambodia and the Mekong Region. It’s an excellent platform for buyers, sellers, travel agencies, hoteliers, restaurant owners, airline operators, and all tourism stakeholders from all over the world to meet and explore possibilities for business cooperation.

Myanmar’s e-Visa

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

Myanmar aims for 5 million through its doors.

Beguiling Myanmar

Beguiling Myanmar

Myanmar has this week introduced a new e-Visa service, designed to encourage more tourists to visit the country, as they aim to welcome 5 million visitors by 2015. The e-Visa is open to tourists from 41 countries, including the UK and USA, but only grants entry to the country at Yangon International Airport, making the method unsuitable for those crossing at land borders. The single-entry e-Visa costs $50, will be stamped on arrival (it must be stamped within 90 days of the approval letter being issued) and is valid for 28 days. Applicants need to supply a colour, passport-size photograph taken in the last three months and details of a return ticket. For anyone looking to visit Myanmar and its intriguing sites, the best time to visit is during the cool, dry season between November and February.

Myanmar is THE place to go

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

The Lonely Planet guide to Myanmar is hot off the press. It’s definitely worth reading especially as previously off-limits areas are opening up and the crowds are heading to Myanmar in ever-increasing numbers.

Shwedagon Paya, Myanmar

Shwedagon Paya, Myanmar

The brand new Lonely Planet guide to Myanmar, 425 pages of hotel and eating suggestions, maps, photographs and recommendations that will help you to plan your perfect visit from your armchair at home. Their Myanmar Top 10 is a listing of what you must include in your itinerary, and here it is:

1 – Shwedagon Paya. 2- Inle Lake. 3- Bagan. 4 – Mrauk U. 5 – Kalaw. 6 – Pyin Oo Lwin. 7 – Mt Kyaiktiyo (Golden Rock). 8 – Mawlamyine. 9 – Hsipaw. 10 – Myeil Arcgipelago.

So why did the Shwedagon Paya come in at number 1? Is there a more stunning monument to religion in Southeast Asia? We don’t think so – says LP. In fact, the sheer size and mystical aura of Yangon’s guilded masterpiece may even cause you to question your inner atheist. But it’s not all about quiet contemplation: Shwedagon Paya is equal parts religious pilgrimage and amusement park, and your visit may coincide with a noisy ordination ceremony or fantastic fortune-telling session. If you’re looking for one reason to linger in Yangon before heading upcountry, this is it. Make sure Myanmar is on your radar.

A personal look at Yangon

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Fodor’s Travel invited author Jan-Philipp Sendker to blog about one of his favourite cities, Myanmar’s Yangon.

With the exception of the magnificent Shwedagon Pagoda, the city of Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar, is surprisingly devoid of major sightseeing highlights. But what the city lacks in obvious points of interest, it makes up for in ubiquitous charm. The best way to enjoy the city is oftentimes simply just to step outside your door and wander. Rather than worry about checking off all the major tourist destinations in a city, you’ll be free to simply enjoy Yangon without the pressure of having to “see it all.” Here are five things to keep in mind when exploring the city.

Keep an Open Mind

Strolling the city without a must-see, must-do list is one of the most pleasant and exciting things about visiting Yangon. Only a few years ago, Yangon was one of the most laidback cities in Southeast Asia, with only a few cars on the streets, no high-rise buildings, and no neon signs. Today, the first thing you’ll notice is how much it’s changing. This sleeping beauty is evolving into a typical Asian cosmopolitan city, with the cars, traffic jams, and construction to match. Still, Yangon has held onto its unique charm and the best way to enjoy the city is simply to see where the wind takes you.

Visit Downtown

Though the size of downtown means that it is far too large to see all at once, it’s worth a stroll through the city’s center. Leave the main roads and crisscross the side streets, where the sidewalks are covered with stalls full of tropical fruits and chairs and tables from tea houses. You should sit down and try the local specialty, a Burmese tea, a strong black tea with lots of sweetened milk. While enjoying your beverage, people may walk by and greet you with a smile or a nod, or a student may approach you hoping to practice his or her English. Be sure to take in the impressive colonial style buildings you find downtown and you’ll understand why many travelers have called Yangon the most beautiful city in Southeast Asia. For a taste of local diversity, walk through Chinatown and Little India. They are only a few blocks apart, and both are overcrowded and full of small shops and restaurants, but have completely distinct feels: different smells, different sights, and different sounds.

Keep an Eye on Local Events

Grab a copy of one of the English-language weeklies or dailies to see what is going on in the city, or buy an issue of The Irrawaddy, the best monthly political magazine. It will update you on all the challenges the country is facing in its difficult transition to democracy.

Be Wary of Traffic

Traffic is heavy nowadays and most people only acquired a driver’s license rather recently. But Yagonians drive the way they conduct other businesses, patiently and passively. Rarely will you hear a horn or see cars jump lanes or cut off other drivers. When you want to cross the street, it won’t take long for someone to stop and let you cross. In other Asian cities, you could be waiting for days. The particularly daring traveler should head to 19th Street at night, when the area is closed to traffic and full of crowded restaurants. Chairs, tables, and grills crowd the sidewalk and road, with the delicious smell of freshly barbecued meat, fish, and vegetables wafting through the air. Enjoy your food with a cold beer or white wine from Myanmar. The local vineyard was founded and is still run by a German.

See the Shwedagon Pagoda

No matter how often you’ve been to Yangon, the highlight of any trip is sure to be a visit to the magical Shwedagon Pagoda. Crowded from sunrise to sunset with people praying, meditating, eating, and chatting, you can easily spend hours here. Find a spot in the shade of the temple or pavilion and people watch while listening to the chime of the bells. Very little has changed here, with the exception of new ATMs scattered throughout.

Jan-Philipp Sendker is the internationally bestselling author of  The Art of Hearing Heartbeats. His latest novel is A Well-Tempered Heart.

For inspiration on visiting Myanmar, take a look at Hanuman’s suggested tours throughout the country at http://www.hanuman.travel/Tours/Myanmar/Myanmar.html.

Glorious Bagan

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

Hanuman Travel TV takes a look at the amazing temples and lifestyle of Bagan, the jewel in Myanmar’s crown.

 

Myanmar’s top tourism draw card is undoubtedly the 4,000 Buddhist temples of Bagan. A building frenzy in the 11-13th centuries produced a stunning array of iconic brick stupas that dot the plains as far as the eye can see. Today, the temples are as venerated as they were when they were built and though a few popular structures are crowded with visitors, many remain remote and quiet and just waiting to be explored. Temple viewing around dawn and dusk is a must as Bagan is hot, especially in the sizzling months of March to May, and cooler in the peak travel season of November to February.

Our Top Ten Experiences

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Try Hanuman’s Top Ten Authentic Experiences in Indochina.

Elephants in Mondulkiri, Cambodia

Elephants in Mondulkiri, Cambodia

Enjoy a helicopter ride over remote temples or the islands of Halong Bay, enjoy a nostalgic city tour by vintage car, meet leading artists and sculptors in the regional art scene, learn the secrets of local recipes with a celebrity chef and learn the art of travel photography with a professional. All these authentic experiences are possible in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam through Hanuman.

Helicopter Flights : Take to the skies to see the region from a different view. Fly to remote jungle temples in the far north of Cambodia, the endless array of temples in Bagan or discover the dramatic scale of Halong Bay from the air.

The Art of Travel Photography : Learn the tricks of the photographic trade from one of the professional photographers living in the region, including diverse destinations such as the temples of Angkor, lovely Luang Prabang, balloons over Bagan and the Mekong Delta.

Living History in Selected Cities : Understand the complicated history of the war years in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam with a history tour of the leading cities. Experience an intimate tour of iconic locations in Phnom Penh, Saigon and Vientiane.

Wine and Dine in Memorable Places : Enjoy an exclusive private champagne dinner in a unique location. Imagine dinner at one of Angkor’s ancient temples or a romantic picnic on a deserted tropical island.

Encounter Wildlife in Remote Places : Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam have an extensive network of national parks. Sleep in a treehouse with the Gibbon Experience in Laos, visit Prek Toal Bird Sanctuary near Siem Reap or see rare langurs in Vietnam.

Cooking with a Celebrity Chef : Experience a cookery demonstration with one of the region’s finest chefs to learn more about the delights of Cambodian, Laotian or Vietnamese cuisine. This can be arranged in most popular visitor destinations.

Meet the Movers and Shakers : Enjoy a private meal with one of the leading lights of the Mekong region, from royal family members in Cambodia to respected international figures who live in Laos and Vietnam.

Hidden Treasures of Indochina : Enjoy exclusive access to leading museums and conservation departments of the region with leading art experts and archaeologists. Go behind the scenes to see forgotten treasures not on display.

City Tour by Vintage Car or Motorcycle : Explore the bustling streets of cities in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam by vintage car. For the more adventurous, it is possible to experience a city tour on the back of an old motorbike.

Yoga Class in Unique Locations : Relax and unwind with your own private yoga session somewhere to remember. Try one of the more remote and secluded beaches of Vietnam or one of the lesser known temples around Angkor.